Huck finn analysis

The theme becomes even more evident once Huck and Jim set out down the Mississippi. Copy to Clipboard.

Huckleberry finn summary chapter 1

Huck meows back and goes outside, to find Tom Sawyer waiting for him. Because Huck believes that the laws of society are just, he condemns himself as a traitor and a villain for acting against them and aiding Jim. The Widow Douglas is good and kind, and yet, like many members of society, she can be a hypocrite. The two characters band together in an act of mutual escape, setting out on a raft down the Mississippi River. Humor is used in various ways in the novel, but Huck's deadpan narration and pragmatic personality juxtaposed to events and beliefs that make no logical or practical sense to him provide much of the novel's humor. By using the first person narrative point of view, Twain carries on the southwestern humor tradition of vernacular language; that is, Huck sounds as a young, uneducated boy from Missouri should sound. When Huck is unable to conform to the rules, he accepts that it is his own deficiency, not the rule, that is bad. When Huck declares, "All right, then, I'll go to hell," he refuses his place in society and heaven, and the magnitude of his decision is what solidifies his role as a heroic figure. Judge Thatcher has taken Huck's money and invested it with a dollar of interest coming in each day, and Huck now lives with the Widow Douglas and her sister, Miss Watson. Huck Finn is Huck's story, and he will tell it from his natural, unsophisticated perspective.

There he meets Jim, whose status as a runaway slave marks him as an even more serious victim of social strictures. Huck meows back and goes outside, to find Tom Sawyer waiting for him. For example, when Miss Watson tells Huck that "she was going to live so as to go to the good place [heaven]," Huck, applying what he knows about Miss Watson and the obvious lifestyle that makes her happy, responds that he "couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going," and makes up his mind to not try to get there.

huckleberry finn summary

As they run from civilization and are on the river, they ponder the social injustices forced upon them when they are on land. For example, Huck simply accepts, at face value, the abstract social and religious tenets pressed upon him by Miss Watson until his experiences cause him to make decisions in which his learned values and his natural feelings come in conflict.

He tells Mary Jane Wilks the truth about the duke and king, marking the beginning of his moral evolution, as he acts out of compassion for Mary Jane rather than self-interest.

Huckleberry finn introduction

When Huck declares, "All right, then, I'll go to hell," he refuses his place in society and heaven, and the magnitude of his decision is what solidifies his role as a heroic figure. Miss Watson tells Huck he will go to "the bad place" if he does not behave, and Huck thinks that will be okay as long as Miss Watson is not there. As with several of the frontier literary characters that came before him, Huck possesses the ability to adapt to almost any situation through deceit. Huck does not laugh at humorous situations and statements simply because his literal approach does not find them to be funny; he fails to see the irony. Such boundaries, like religion, serve the dead. Huck grows bored of societal rigidity and runs away, only to be convinced to return by Tom Sawyer's imaginative games, which promise a kind of adventure if not "real" adventure. The Glass Menagerie Commentary Ironically, Huck believes he is committing a sin by going against society and protecting Jim. Huck enjoys his adventures on the raft.

Huck grows bored of societal rigidity and runs away, only to be convinced to return by Tom Sawyer's imaginative games, which promise a kind of adventure if not "real" adventure.

He looks out his window at nature, sees the stars, and hears mournful, ghostly sounds in the leaves and in the birdcalls. They try to reverse all of his teachings from the first twelve years of his life and force him to become their stereotypical good boy.

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SparkNotes: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Plot analysis